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Not done yet: If 65 is the new 50, how will baby boomers remake retirement?

Cover Story: April 2010, ABA Journal
By Barbara Rose

Philadelphia attorney Robert Heim quickly scanned the list of partners eligible for election to his law firm’s policy committee, hunting for his name. He enjoyed this familiar ritual. Like so many other validations, the list confirmed his leadership at a firm where he made partner three decades ago. He took pride in having won election every year in which he was eligible. But this year would be different.  Read more:

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Home is where the dads are: Men making switch as wives earn more, parenting roles change

Oct. 26, 2008, Chicago Tribune
By Barbara Rose

As the date when Evelyn Diaz was due back from maternity leave at a Chicago non-profit loomed, she and her husband, Josh Walsman, discussed their child-care options. Several conversations later, the first-time parents concluded that he was the logical choice to stay home with their newborn. Read more:
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Rockin’ in your cubicle: More workers are using their iPods to escape boredom or chaos in the office. Does it help them focus, or is it a distraction?

Feb. 7, 2006, Chicago Tribune
By Barbara Rose

Peter Hubert keeps a mirror on his desk so he can see people walking up behind him, even if he can’t hear them. Headphones clamped on, MP3 player plugged in, the 28-year-old draftsman has fashioned a virtual office using invisible walls of sound.  Read more:

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Eat better, get a bonus from your employer: Veggie wraps are a bargain and pizza costs more as companies push smarter eating to fight costs of obesity

Oct. 6, 2006, Chicago Tribune
By Barbara Rose

In a culture riddled with conflicting messages about food, where nearly two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese, employers desperate to control soaring health costs are trying to change America’s eating habits.  Read more:

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White-Collar Jobless Blues: For some who lost their jobs in the 2001 recession, weeks of unemployment have stretched into years, forcing them to take `survival jobs’

July 17, 2005, Chicago Tribune
By Barbara Rose

William Spolec sips iced tea at a window table in a busy downtown Starbucks. Dressed in slacks and a knit shirt, a brown leather attache case at his feet, he easily could be mistaken for a casually dressed professional taking a late afternoon break. Instead, the veteran human resources executive is early for a seven-hour shift behind Starbucks’ counter.  Read more: